Another Day, Another Idiot Arab Statement

In today’s Arab Times Online, Ahmed Al-Jarallah, editor-in-chief, penned an amazingly childish editorial that does nothing but prove the arrogance and stupidity of the Arab people towards Pakistan. Before I start with my analysis, I will again repeat that I am not on anyone’s side. I am Pakistani and stand only with Pakistan.

The article starts with the familiar refrain that the UAE Minister of Foreign Affairs tweeted, “May God bless difficulties that made me differentiate my friends from enemies,” cited as a part of a poem that has no name or author. This refrain is something that, if we had real leadership in Pakistan, could easily have been said to the Arabs at any point over the last few decades.

The editor would like to make the Arab public believe that Pakistan is an equal partner in the region, but fails to point out that Pakistan is neither a member of the Arab League or the GCC, while India has been added as an observer. India’s addition was done against the protests of Pakistan, but “our brothers” in the Middle East didn’t feel our opinion was of value at that time.

Then he makes an interesting statement, which contradicts what the Saudi Foreign Minister said on Saturday, “when the GCC countries decided to face the challenge of Iran in Yemen.” The Saudis say that this isn’t a war with Iran, rather a fight to re-install the appointed President, who is not legitimate no matter how many times you say it. With the confession that the invasion is to counter Iran, this whole scenario takes on a different structure. We’ll get to that in a minute.

To claim that Pakistan is attempting to profit from the invasion to “revive our distressed economy,” is beyond insulting. It’s also a crushing admission of the relationship that the GCC has fostered for decades in Pakistan. It has been the UAE that threatened “heavy costs” for the Parliament’s decision. It is Saudi Arabia’s faithful stooges in Pakistan that have argued the amount of money that has been given to Pakistan in the past years. But I would address it in a different way.

Could the honorable editor explain the recent payment of $12.5 billion to the Egyptians immediately prior to the start of the invasion and the promise to pay for all the weapons they are purchasing from the United States? Would that not be considered a bribe, payoff or incentive by the honorable editor?

But then, it was Saudi Arabia that stood against the people’s elected government and installed a military dictator at the helm in Cairo, so now you must support him and his demands.

He calls our position of protecting the Islamic sanctuaries a “tool for political blackmail,” as if the announcement of Pakistan’s involvement in the invasion at the start was not an attempt to force Pakistan into a war we have no stake in. Or the statements that have emerged from GCC countries in response to our democratic parliament’s decision to maintain neutrality, blackmail as well.

Then comes the most hilarious statement in the editorial:

“the GCC countries are aware right from the start that assistance offered to the country is meant to extinguish the fire of extremism which is widespread in the region and to assist Islamabad in overcoming poverty. This is because poverty is the main reason for some countries’ inability to control activities of terrorists, which threaten security of the Arabian Gulf and Islamic nations.”

Let us be blatantly clear and honest with this. It is not a hidden fact that the GCC countries are involved in funding extremist madrassahs (made public since the attack on Army Public School in Peshawar), they are involved in funding extremist organizations in Pakistan (known for decades), and that they are financially and militarily supporting the Baluchistan insurgents. When the government of Pakistan asked them to stop their funding, we were shown the middle finger and told to go screw ourselves. The editor of this publication seems to be blind to the reality of the facts on the ground and would like to create a perfect scenario where the GCC is blameless in our problems, when every Pakistani knows that they are fully complicit in all of them.

Let us also be clear that the Saudi-led bombing of Yemen has not targeted ANY ISIS or al-Qaeda camps, only those of the Houthis. We can see where your loyalties lie.

I also appreciate the biased review of our military history in the region:

“It was defeated in all wars, starting from the war against India that led to the birth of Bangladesh in 1970 until the war against Taleban whose terrorist activities Pakistan could not curtail,”

Could the GCC please let us know which war they won without the Pakistan Army’s assistance?

I seem to remember a war that lasted 6 days that handed the Arabs their asses on a platter, an invasion of this same Kuwait that had to be repelled by the US and Pakistan working together and now Yemen. And that same 6 day war was against these same coalition partners who are now afraid to lift their heads against the Israelis, allowing them to brutalize the Palestinians who are also Arabs, by the way.

Could the honorable editor explain why, if our military has failed so amazingly, they are begging us to stand by them and fight a war that they started? Could the honorable editor also explain why it is Pakistan’s military minds that are regularly begged for from the GCC and Saudi Arabia to train their third-rate soldiers?

He finishes with the chorus that the GCC doesn’t need Pakistan, Pakistan needs the GCC. Well, let’s put that to the test. Enough of the rhetoric, go fight. The United States is uneasy with the campaign that is being waged in Yemen because it weakens their counter-terrorism activities in the country, the continued bombing of the Yemen military bases makes it unlikely that even if the “President” is re-annointed that he will be able to last, and the specific targeting of hospitals and homes by the Saudis will lead to war crimes charges. The US will not protect you like it does Israel, so get that foolish thought out of your heads.

So please, get your armies together and go fight. Invade Yemen, let us see who you need and who you don’t need. And when your monarchies fall, because without our army to protect you, there will be no GCC or House of Saud, we shall see who needs who.

Oh yes, and the admission about Iran. It’s sad that Saudi Arabia and the GCC will do the bidding of other countries to counter Iran. It was Saudi Arabia that lobbied the United States for action against Syria. It was Saudi Arabia that stood with Israel against the P5+1 nuclear deal with Iran. It was Saudi Arabia that has repeatedly offered its air space to Israel to bomb Iran’s nuclear facilities. So when you finally admit that it is not about re-annointing a illegitimate President, this analyst isn’t surprised at all.

My advice to the editor of Arab Times Online is quite simple. You can do all the dances that you want pretending that you are lions. You can rattle your sabres as much as you want thinking that you are warriors. But the rhetoric being used against Pakistan shows one clear point.

You have started a war that you know will lead to the fall of your kingdoms. America will provide many things, they will not provide boots on the ground. And that realization is setting in very quickly. As the world watches, you are being judged for the criminality and brutality of the ill-thought attack a sovereign Muslim country, where al-Qaeda and ISIS are gaining strength each day.

You have no resolution from the UN Security Council, Arab League or Organization of Islamic Countries to endorse your invasion of Yemen. No country other than the United States, United Kingdom and France has endorsed your actions, which interestingly are the same three countries that stand shoulder to shoulder with Israel when bombing Gaza.

The fires of hell are about to engulf you and you are busy pointing fingers at Pakistan, a country that you have demonstrated your absolute disdain for.

So may I ask, why are you so upset that we aren’t supporting you?

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About Khalid Muhammad - Author

When people talk about Khalid Muhammad, they talk about an entrepreneur who has helped others build their dreams and businesses. They talk about a teacher, who is dedicated to his students, both inside and outside the classroom, and they return the dedication tenfold. Now, they talk about the author, who has written a fast-paced, action-packed spy thriller about Pakistan, the politics, the Army and terrorism. Born in Pakistan’s troubled Swat Valley, educated and raised in the United States, Khalid returned to Pakistan almost 17 years ago and fell in love with his country. His debut novel, Agency Rules – Never an Easy Day at the Office, is a journey behind the headlines about Pakistan, the world’s most dangerous place, to deliver an intense story that will challenge the reader to question what they have been told.

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A Nation at War, Intelligence Communique

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